What You Should Know About…Kaleen Rugs

This Thanksgiving weekend, our customers enjoy a 20% discount on all Kaleen rugs, in addition to our already low prices. Being family-owned and vertically-integrated might seem like buzz terms used to add style and hype to a brand’s image, but Kaleen places special meaning behind those words. From sourcing the fiber to dyeing the yarn, to designing and weaving the rugs to selling the finished product, the family in charge of Kaleen Rugs is involved in every step, eliminating process inefficiencies to lower manufacturing costs. That kind of meticulous quality control results in a high-quality product Rug & Home is able to offer our customers at a great value.

 

Kaleen Rugs specializes exclusively in hand-tufted rugs, consistently pushing the boundaries of fashion with their modern designs. With simple, clean, fresh designs, it’s hard to deny Kaleen their position as the best in the hand-tufted world.

 

Every rug collection is personally curated by the Rug & Home buying team. Here are some of our favorites:

Nomad NOMO6 Red

Nomad: Hand-tufted, flat-woven construction gives these geo-prints and tribal designs a global, well-traveled feel. 5′ x 8′ – $339

Matira MAT02-17 Blue

Matira: Inspired by the secluded beaches of Bora Bora, these indoor-outdoor rugs will brighten any room! 5′ x 7’6″ – $269

Casablanca CAS04 Ivory

Casablanca: Trendy Moroccan designs featured in hand-tufted wool. 5′ x 8′ – $339

Bimini-10

Bimini: These hand-tufted polypropylene indoor-outdoor rugs provide a simple look with a soft hand. 5′ x 8′ – $219

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The Romantic Origins of Oriental Rugs

The Romantic Origins of Oriental Rugs

By definition, an Oriental rug is hand-knotted with wool or silk, made in an area that includes China, Turkey, India, and everything in between. Although different cultures and religious faiths developed their own techniques and signature styles, all are considered “Oriental rugs.”

The oldest known sample was discovered in 1948 in a frozen burial mound in Outer Mongolia near Pazryk. Believed to be from the 5th century BCE, “The Pazryk Carpet” has geometric, floral, and symbolic designs.

The fact that the person was buried with his carpet indicates the personal identification and meaning attributed to the item. The quality of this carpet demonstrates that the art of rug making had become, even by then, a sophisticated practice.

 

cyrus-the-greatOriental Rugs in History

King Cyrus the Great (circa 500 BCE) is said to have decorated his palace with carpets so intricate and so colorful that they dazzled visitors. Historians believe that artisans in the Persian and Egyptian Empires had developed weaving independently by the second millennium BCE. Evidence suggests that hand-knotted rugs existed in parts of Asia and the Middle East more than 4000 years ago. By the 8th century BCE, well-to-do families were using rugs to decorate and personalize their homes — not only on the floors, but also on the walls and even on the tables.

The Romance of Oriental Rugs

Ancient Oriental rugs weren’t necessarily made for practical reasons. As shown by The Pazryk Carpet, rugs had sentimental value. As a modern mother knits booties for her baby, the artisans of old crafted their cleopatracarpets with love to bring beauty and comfort to their families.

The vibrant colors of a rug mirrored the world around them. The symbols had personal and cultural overtones. It acted as jewelry in a time before jewels, a gift that took precious time to make, designed with a specific person in mind. The recipient of a hand-made rug likely kept it close at all times: using it during meals, prayer, and sleep.

In one believably romantic story, the beauteous and seductive Cleopatra, queen of Egypt, sailed across the Mediterranean Sea to visit Rome. In order to gain audience with Mark Antony, she had herself wrapped in an Egyptian rug of the finest texture to be presented to him as a gift. That introduction, as you may know, led to one of the most dramatic romances of all time!

Oriental Rugs Today

Because Oriental rugs developed over time from a very wide geographic area, they are named after the place where local artisans weaved them. The designs, palettes, and techniques link individual rugs to the jaipurindigenous culture that produced it, and experts can often tell at a glance where a particular rug originated. Floral or formal patterns, for example, reflect a more urban artisan, while geometric patterns indicate a rural or tribal rug maker.

Today, most Oriental rugs come from China, India, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia, Tibet, and Turkey. Persian rugs, a subset of Oriental rugs, are only made in Iran (formerly Persia). These rugs are known for a thick pile, brilliant color patterns, inventive designs, and a unique weave.

The beauty of any Oriental rug is in part tied to its link to the past — in its color, design, and originality. Although Oriental rugs have their origins thousands of years ago, little has changed. True Oriental rugs are still made by human hands practicing an ancient skill. Their romance as gifts also continue.

 

 

Sari Silk – The Ultimate Recycled Rugs

Sari Silk — The Ultimate Recycled Rugs
upcyclesariSome call it recycling; others think the process deserves a name with a more positive connotation. Thus, the term upcycling was born. Upcycling means taking something that would otherwise be thrown away — in this case, fabric — and making it into an even better product. In upcycling, the old parts do not equal the new whole.
Sari Silk rugs are an upcycling success story. Made from the silk that once graced the saris destined to be worn by Indian women, these rugs have become some of the most colorful, most imaginative, and most sought-after pieces on the market today. A sari is a four-to-nine-yard length of cloth, often silk, that women wrap around themselves as their garment.
sari5Upcycling Saris
The saris upcycled into rugs are typically composed of handspun silk. Since the rugs’ popularity has skyrocketed, women’s cooperatives in India have developed a cottage industry to create the vibrant silk thread that’s then used to hand-knot the fabulous rugs.
The women unravel unused saris by hand, fortify the extracted silk with cotton, wool, or other fibers, and then weave the threads into unique patterns that end up looking like pieces of art — which they are. The breathtaking creations, made entirely of this fortified sari silk, are saturated with colors and are so soft that you may find yourself wanting to leave the sofa to snuggle on the floor.
One-of-a-Kind Masterpieces
No two Sari Silk rugs are alike because of the variety of the source saris collected by the Indian women. Once the fabric has been hand-knotted into rugs, they become the one-of-a-kind masterpieces you can find at Rug & Home.
These hand-crafted works of art contain inconsistencies in their patterns and variations in their colors — elements that heighten their beauty instead of detracting from it. You will experience an infinite variety of sari1color in your Sari Silk rugs.
Caring for Your Treasures
These natural rugs are durable and will hold up for decades if you take care of them properly. Don’t place your Sari Silk rug in a place that receives heavy traffic, but do lay them on top of a quality rug pad, such as those sold at Rug & Home. You may also want to keep it out of direct sunlight.
Put your colorful work of art where it will be seen rather than trampled, such as by a corner sitting area, underneath a table or baby grand piano, or in your bedroom. Some owners love their rugs too much to walk on them, preferring instead to hang them on the wall.
Sari Silk rugs require gentle vacuuming with suction only, although you can have them hand-washed by a professional cleaner as needed.
It’s worth the little extra time and the effort it takes to care for a Sari Silk rug because they will last longer. In the end, you won’t think of them as upcycled or even recycled … you’ll just love and respect the beauty of your one-of-a-kind rug.

Cleaning the Post-Holiday Mess Out of Your Rugs

after the partyYou’ve finished the cheese balls and wine, run out of desserts, and burned down the candles. The guests have finally left. After counting the silverware, you take out the trash, fluff the pillows on the sofa, and return your dining room to its normal configuration. Time to relax, right?

Wrong.

If your holiday parties are anything like ours, you’ll find a half-full glass tucked behind a chair. You’ll notice the wine stains on your beautiful Oriental rug in the living room, discover an unsightly mixture of fruit and chocolate smeared on the tufted dining room rug, and to your great dismay, see that wax dripped down onto the new throw rugs you placed in the spare bedroom.  After the expense of the holidays, the last thing you want to do is to refurnish your floors. Luckily, you can take steps to clean your rugs so you can enjoy them into the next holiday Wine on rugseason and beyond.

Cleaning Orientals

Let’s start with your fabulous Oriental rug. Hand-knotted rugs should be professionally cleaned. If you invested in a quality wool masterpiece, we recommend you take it to the experts. But you can do it yourself … if you’re very careful.  Start by vacuuming both sides, using suction from a hand tool to keep the beater bar from pulling up loose strands. Then use a mild soap — Dawn dishwashing soap is ideal — mixed in cool water. Avoid products that contain bleach, ammonia, or other strong chemicals. Test a corner of the rug to make sure the soap doesn’t alter the dye colors.

vaccumScrub the rug gently with a long-bristled soft brush or sponge, rubbing in the direction of the nap. Thoroughly soak the rug. When done, squeeze out the water — a rubber squeegee does the most efficient job. Push the moisture out towards the end of the rug along the pile of the nap. If you have enough space, hang the rug to dry. Otherwise, lie it flat to dry. Once the nap is dry, turn it over to let the back dry.

Other Cleaning Solutions

Hand-tufted rugs are a different story. These rugs have a canvas backing glued on to hold the wool fibers in place. You can’t get these rugs wet. The best way to tackle stains is with a spot cleaner such as Capture (sold at all Rug & Home locations). Clean each spot separately, patting Capture Products availabel at Rug & Homethe excess moisture quickly so it doesn’t seep through to the glue. Pat the spot repeatedly with a damp sponge. Try it again if necessary and keep at it until you’re satisfied.

Getting candle wax out of a rug requires paper towels and a warm iron. Layer paper towels over the wax and rest the iron on the spot. Do not let the iron touch the wax directly. After a few seconds, lift the iron; the wax has melted into the paper towels. Repeat with clean paper towels until you’ve lifted out all the drippings. As a final step, treat with a spot cleaner.

Once you finish cleaning, rub the dry fibers on your rugs with a soft brush to loosen them up and release any leftover soap. Vacuum. Now you’re ready to send out invitations for a spring fling!

How to Choose a Bedroom Rug

A bedroom area rug serves many purposes. It gives your bare feet a warm place to land when you get out of bed on a cold winter morning. It reduces noise in the bedroom, especially if your alternative is a hardwood floor (which while beautiful, can amplify sound). A bedroom rug can also accent your bed covering and window treatments.

A plush bedroom rug keeps your toes warm when they hit the floor on cold winter mornings.

A plush bedroom rug keeps your toes warm when they hit the floor on cold winter mornings.

As with most interior design precepts, there are no hard and fast rules to choosing a bedroom rug — what you like should be the most important factor in your decorating decisions. There are, however, a few guidelines to consider when shopping for a new bedroom area rug.

Placement

First, decide where you’re going to place the rug. If you have an exceptionally large bedroom, you can choose to lay smaller rugs in different areas. For example, place one rug in the corner under your sitting area and a larger, complementary rug angled across the bottom of the bed. If you prefer symmetry, place one large rug under the bed so that it peeks out equally on all sides. For a small bedroom, you’ll be best served with a-rug-under-the-bed solution because small area rugs chop up the space and make the room appear even smaller.

SizePhoto Nov 13, 4 05 06 PM

The size of your bed usually determines the size of rug you need. In a traditional bedroom with a nightstand on each side of the bed, place the rug just in front of the side tables. A king-size bed is 76 X 80 inches, which means a 9 X 12-foot rug will provide adequate coverage on all sides. An 8 X 10-foot rug, meanwhile, is sufficient for a queen-size (60 X 80-inch) bed. Both of these choices leave plenty of soft surface area to walk on all the way around the bed.

Another option for your queen-size bed is to place a 6 X 9-foot rug horizontally under the bed, giving you enough rug to land on when you leave the bed, but little at the foot of the bed, which is ideal if you have a chest or blanket holder sitting there. Alternatively, you can always place matching runners along the sides of your bed with a complementary or matching 4 X 6-foot rug at the foot of the bed (although you can get away with a 5 X 8-footer if you have enough room).

Photo Nov 13, 4 06 58 PMStyle

It’s always easier to match your bedcovers and curtains to the rug than it is to find the perfect rug to go with your other décor. But remember that your taste should trump any convention, especially in your bedroom. Given that overriding advice, here are some specific guidelines:

  • Stick with hand-knotted Oriental rugs to complement a traditional room with cherry furniture, high bedposts, or antiques.
  • If you’ve got a more minimalist style, use the floor to splash color in the room or continue with the overall style and use a rug with muted tones that match your color scheme.
  • Floral patterns on your linens may be more difficult to complement, but if you stick with traditional rugs, you should be able to pull out the primary colors in the room with your floor covering.

Whatever color, style, or fabric you choose for your bedroom, make sure you absolutely love it. It may be the last thing you see before putting out the light every night and the first thing you see when you climb out of bed every morning.

Kannapolis New Arrivals

If you have been into the Kannapolis showroom recently, then you have seen and felt the comfort of our newly arrived Comfort Designs leather sectional.  This sectional, like other models available from this brand, can be customized in a variety of leathers, but we love this piece just the way it is!

Tell us what you think of this room!  We would love to know your opinion!

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Art and Practicality Converge in Gabbeh Rugs

Gabbeh (pronounced “gah-BAY”) is the Farsi word for natural or raw. In this case, it describes the coarse materials used to create early tribal rugs in Persia. The Gabbeh weaving tradition dates back as far as 3500 BC. Those first Gabbeh rugs were made by nomadic women to protect tender feet and to decorate bare homes. While they were practical, they also inspired. The artisans who wove those ancient rugs infused their designs with symbols that displayed their spirit, artistic talents, and love for family. In time, certain symbols evolved to impart love, prosperity, and good fortune to their families.

Modern families can grace their homes with those same sentiments with a beautifully hand-knotted Gabbeh rug from either India or Iran. Since both hand-weavers and modern manufacturers incorporate the emblematic characters found in early Gabbeh rugs, you can find the symbols on all-wool hand-tufted rugs and even in the synthetics used in machine-made rugs.

Each character woven in a Gabbeh rug has its own unique meaning. Some of the most common symbols found on today’s Gabbeh rugs include:

  • The Cypress Tree stands for life after death.
  • The Lion boasts of honor and victory.
  • A Camel is a common symbol for wealth and happiness.
  • Peacocks are holy birds that symbolize the spiritual nature of man.
  • The Dog serves as man’s protector, saving him from his own misdeeds and harm from others.
  • The Cock represents the devil; it’s woven into rugs to protect the owner from outside evil.
  • A Comb suggests cleanliness and brings wishes of health to the family.
  • The Hourglass reminds the family that time passes for everyone.
  • A strip of Clouds sends happiness to the family.
  • A Pomegranate is the ancient symbol of abundant wealth.
  • The Tree of Life, one of the most common symbols, expresses the belief in eternal life.

The characters are woven as small geometric shapes, caricatures of the symbols they portray. On some rugs, they are lined up in no particular sequence, bringing a wealth of wishes to the bearer. Other rugs focus on a primary wish, such as the popular Lion Gabbeh rug that contains one or two bigger lions surrounded by smaller lions in a horizontal pattern, ideal for a family of warriors. Gabbeh symbols may be also woven into a larger pattern made of a floral motif. In these rugs, you may have to look closely to see the artistic symbols imbedded in the overall pattern.

No matter which kind of Gabbeh rug you purchase, the original thoughts and heart-felt symbols can bring an aura of love and good intentions to your home. You may recognize the symbols and be able to interpret their meanings, but even if you can’t, a Gabbeh rug has an uncanny way of snuggling up to your heart and making you feel good somehow. Perhaps it’s the ghosts of the tribal Persian women who loved and cared for their families, or perhaps it’s the actual resonance of the symbols themselves.