Measuring for Accuracy

image from lowes.com

image from lowes.com

Before you buy a new rug, you should consider multiple variables: color, design, texture, and of course, size. Most people will have an idea of the color (or colors) they want because, if they are only buying the rug, it has to match their existing décor. Similarly, the design or style — whether traditional or contemporary — should also match the style of the room the rug is meant for.

Texture is a variable that depends on taste as well as function. Does the rug have to accommodate a lot of traffic? Does the rug have to fit beneath a swinging door or a dining table? Individuals will choose different textures, based on common sense and personal preference.

The Thing About Size

Size, however, is the most scientific variable. Anyone can determine the ideal size of a new rug by following a few simple steps:

1.First, measure your entire room, wall to wall. Use a good-quality measuring tape, if possible.

image from shelterpop.com

image from shelterpop.com

2.On a piece of paper, draw the room dimensions in scale. Include doors, windows, fireplaces, radiators, and heating vents, where necessary.

3.Measure the existing furniture. Either add them to your drawing or, even better, cut out blocks of paper for each piece, so you can easily and quickly “rearrange the furniture.”

4.Next, measure the space you think you want to cover. Unless you want a customized rug (and are willing to spend the price for one), don’t get too specific. Measure out and mark off standard sizes: 4×6, 5×8, 6×9, 8×10 feet. One trick is to use masking tape to outline the rug’s Printdimensions.

5.Always double-check your measurements. Like the seasoned carpenter says, “Measure twice; cut once.”

image from jaipurrugs.com

image from jaipurrugs.com

6.Go shopping! Find a store, like Rug & Home, that allows you to take the rug home and try it out for a day or a week. You’ll know immediately if it’s the right size, but you may need longer to judge the other variables.

Size Matters

We’ve already written about how to find the best size rug for your dining room and bedroom, so check our past posts to get that information. For other rooms, here are a few more tips:

A rug that isn’t properly sized for a room can make the room look uneven or unfinished. To make a positive impression — and more importantly, to give yourself and your family a sense of ease — lay a rug that fits the room.

Don’t size your space just with your eyes. A 6×9-foot rug that seems huge in the store may still be too small for the room once you get it home.

In your living room, place the rug so that your furniture sits either all the way on or all the way off the rug. The only exception to this rule is for a couch. If the couch has its back to a wall, you can get away with having only the front feet on the rug.

If you want to create a cozier space, subtract 1 or 2 feet (12 to 24 inches) from the length and width of the room, as determined in Step 1 above. Even hallway runners shouldn’t crowd the walls.

A new rug is like a new chair: you can tell in the store how comfortable it is, but you won’t know until you get it home how well it fits in to your life. Do your homework before you buy, but make sure you can return it if it doesn’t work.

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The Romantic Origins of Oriental Rugs

The Romantic Origins of Oriental Rugs

By definition, an Oriental rug is hand-knotted with wool or silk, made in an area that includes China, Turkey, India, and everything in between. Although different cultures and religious faiths developed their own techniques and signature styles, all are considered “Oriental rugs.”

The oldest known sample was discovered in 1948 in a frozen burial mound in Outer Mongolia near Pazryk. Believed to be from the 5th century BCE, “The Pazryk Carpet” has geometric, floral, and symbolic designs.

The fact that the person was buried with his carpet indicates the personal identification and meaning attributed to the item. The quality of this carpet demonstrates that the art of rug making had become, even by then, a sophisticated practice.

 

cyrus-the-greatOriental Rugs in History

King Cyrus the Great (circa 500 BCE) is said to have decorated his palace with carpets so intricate and so colorful that they dazzled visitors. Historians believe that artisans in the Persian and Egyptian Empires had developed weaving independently by the second millennium BCE. Evidence suggests that hand-knotted rugs existed in parts of Asia and the Middle East more than 4000 years ago. By the 8th century BCE, well-to-do families were using rugs to decorate and personalize their homes — not only on the floors, but also on the walls and even on the tables.

The Romance of Oriental Rugs

Ancient Oriental rugs weren’t necessarily made for practical reasons. As shown by The Pazryk Carpet, rugs had sentimental value. As a modern mother knits booties for her baby, the artisans of old crafted their cleopatracarpets with love to bring beauty and comfort to their families.

The vibrant colors of a rug mirrored the world around them. The symbols had personal and cultural overtones. It acted as jewelry in a time before jewels, a gift that took precious time to make, designed with a specific person in mind. The recipient of a hand-made rug likely kept it close at all times: using it during meals, prayer, and sleep.

In one believably romantic story, the beauteous and seductive Cleopatra, queen of Egypt, sailed across the Mediterranean Sea to visit Rome. In order to gain audience with Mark Antony, she had herself wrapped in an Egyptian rug of the finest texture to be presented to him as a gift. That introduction, as you may know, led to one of the most dramatic romances of all time!

Oriental Rugs Today

Because Oriental rugs developed over time from a very wide geographic area, they are named after the place where local artisans weaved them. The designs, palettes, and techniques link individual rugs to the jaipurindigenous culture that produced it, and experts can often tell at a glance where a particular rug originated. Floral or formal patterns, for example, reflect a more urban artisan, while geometric patterns indicate a rural or tribal rug maker.

Today, most Oriental rugs come from China, India, Iran, Nepal, Pakistan, Russia, Tibet, and Turkey. Persian rugs, a subset of Oriental rugs, are only made in Iran (formerly Persia). These rugs are known for a thick pile, brilliant color patterns, inventive designs, and a unique weave.

The beauty of any Oriental rug is in part tied to its link to the past — in its color, design, and originality. Although Oriental rugs have their origins thousands of years ago, little has changed. True Oriental rugs are still made by human hands practicing an ancient skill. Their romance as gifts also continue.

 

 

Dining Rooms Trends

classic diningAccording to traditionalists, a dining room must have a formal matching dining room set, preferably wooden. In a traditional home, these rooms are used only for special occasions or the occasional gathering, much like the good china and silverware. To complete the traditional setting, add lace doilies, a crystal chandelier, and an oversized Oriental rug. Keep the children out, wrap it all up in plastic, and you get the picture: it’s a room that’s rarely used.

Modern homeowners, however, want to use the dining room for everyday use. Fortunately, furniture and decorating trends have moved in the same direction, bringing the once little-used room back into the mainstream of daily living.

The first change is one that has been happening for years. Trends continue to make the dining wood & metal diningroom less formal and more livable. Take off the plastic wrap and break out the everyday dishes. Here are some other trends.

Dining Room Tables

The recycling craze has influenced the design of newest dining room tables. Furniture made of recycled wood has become commonplace. Chopping blocks, no longer relegated to the kitchen, have begun appearing in dining room furniture.

Moreover, an industrial look is replacing the shabby chic trends of yesterday. Thick, recycled, roughhewn wood paired with a silver or gunmetal base and legs have become accepted into the mainstream.

paula diningThe industrial look is inviting for a number of reasons. Homeowners at Rug & Home love the sturdiness of the wood and metal furniture. Not only is it trendy, but it’s practical. These dining tables ably set the stage for a meal and then serve as the worktable for the kids’ homework or latest school project.

Plus, these tables will last. They often weigh more than a small car.

Dining Room Chairs

Traditionally, a dining room set requires a matching set of six or eight chairs, whether the dining mismatched diningtable is used daily or just for special occasions. The latest trend, though, encourages mismatched chairs, creating a much more informal appearance that decorators and homeowners alike love.

Have you ever gone shopping for dining rooms chairs and found a half dozen that you loved, but felt driven to choose one and order seven more to match? Now you can buy one of each. You can mix colors, fabrics, and styles. Place a traditional Queen Ann chair beside an industrial gunmetal seat. Set a few chairs around the table with seat cushions beside plain wooden seats.

If you want something really different, good news: the bench is back. Benches have become an integral part of the communal dining spirit that’s transforming eating areas around the country. Benches can be made of recycled wood and matched with similar chairs, or they can stand on their own, covered in leather in complete contrast to your ladder-back chairs. Alternatively, go with two benches and two side chairs.

Regardless what you choose, remember that dining rooms are now considered informal places to eat every day. Make your dining room a comfortable extension of the rest of your home.

Sari Silk – The Ultimate Recycled Rugs

Sari Silk — The Ultimate Recycled Rugs
upcyclesariSome call it recycling; others think the process deserves a name with a more positive connotation. Thus, the term upcycling was born. Upcycling means taking something that would otherwise be thrown away — in this case, fabric — and making it into an even better product. In upcycling, the old parts do not equal the new whole.
Sari Silk rugs are an upcycling success story. Made from the silk that once graced the saris destined to be worn by Indian women, these rugs have become some of the most colorful, most imaginative, and most sought-after pieces on the market today. A sari is a four-to-nine-yard length of cloth, often silk, that women wrap around themselves as their garment.
sari5Upcycling Saris
The saris upcycled into rugs are typically composed of handspun silk. Since the rugs’ popularity has skyrocketed, women’s cooperatives in India have developed a cottage industry to create the vibrant silk thread that’s then used to hand-knot the fabulous rugs.
The women unravel unused saris by hand, fortify the extracted silk with cotton, wool, or other fibers, and then weave the threads into unique patterns that end up looking like pieces of art — which they are. The breathtaking creations, made entirely of this fortified sari silk, are saturated with colors and are so soft that you may find yourself wanting to leave the sofa to snuggle on the floor.
One-of-a-Kind Masterpieces
No two Sari Silk rugs are alike because of the variety of the source saris collected by the Indian women. Once the fabric has been hand-knotted into rugs, they become the one-of-a-kind masterpieces you can find at Rug & Home.
These hand-crafted works of art contain inconsistencies in their patterns and variations in their colors — elements that heighten their beauty instead of detracting from it. You will experience an infinite variety of sari1color in your Sari Silk rugs.
Caring for Your Treasures
These natural rugs are durable and will hold up for decades if you take care of them properly. Don’t place your Sari Silk rug in a place that receives heavy traffic, but do lay them on top of a quality rug pad, such as those sold at Rug & Home. You may also want to keep it out of direct sunlight.
Put your colorful work of art where it will be seen rather than trampled, such as by a corner sitting area, underneath a table or baby grand piano, or in your bedroom. Some owners love their rugs too much to walk on them, preferring instead to hang them on the wall.
Sari Silk rugs require gentle vacuuming with suction only, although you can have them hand-washed by a professional cleaner as needed.
It’s worth the little extra time and the effort it takes to care for a Sari Silk rug because they will last longer. In the end, you won’t think of them as upcycled or even recycled … you’ll just love and respect the beauty of your one-of-a-kind rug.

Kannapolis New Arrivals

If you have been into the Kannapolis showroom recently, then you have seen and felt the comfort of our newly arrived Comfort Designs leather sectional.  This sectional, like other models available from this brand, can be customized in a variety of leathers, but we love this piece just the way it is!

Tell us what you think of this room!  We would love to know your opinion!

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